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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)
us at: captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org masterpiece is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. we are pbs. >> welcome to the program, tonight ratan tata chairman of the tata group and judith rodin president of the rockefeller foundation on the occasion of the presentation of the lifetime achievement award from the rockefeller foundation to ratan tata. >> when you live in a country where there's such disparity of income and such disparity and prosperity, you cannot help but feel that you cannot ignore the millions of people that sometimes struggle for just staying alive. in that you need to do something to not to hand out-- but to bring life back to them. so i think what has been happening in enlightened companies is do something for the communities around where you are operate. >> rose: we conclude this evening with jane harman, former congresswoman from california now president of the woodrow wilson center. >> i think the way to solve the terror threat against us is to win the argument. and how do we win th
to fight for it, so to us, that was a recipe for disaster, and something which could cause major trouble in syria and beyond. that is buy what i have been saying let's stop this policy of sort of frontal attack on the government and let's try to put it together and one missing link in this whole setup so far, including kofi annan's effort is the opposition, numerous pleas to them and numerous conversations with them in various formats, very few have dialogue with the government. >> rose: we conclude this evening with kurt andersen, the novelist and author of true believers. >> i have never read a book about the late sixties that did two things i wanted to do, one, show how the early -- how the lives in the early sixties became lives in the late sixties, how adolescents who went from 12 to 18 in exactly that decade, how that worked, and then i was also interested in looking back at it from the future, so it skips back and forth from the present to the past, to have some, a long view of what was that all about. >> rose: vitaly churkin and kurt andersen when we continue.e rla rfunding for c
understand how people use both their conscious and unconscious mental processes to respond to a work of art. we can outline a scheme of the various steps that are involved in looking at a great painting and having a perceptual response, an emotional response, an empathic response to it. and we can outline in principle how this occurs, that a lot of details that have to be filled out but this is an initial attempt to try to bridge art and brain science. >> rose: and from harvard the theoretical physicist lisa randell. >> what is really wonderful about physics and i think is important it is symptomatic the regime where we understand things and where we need to go beyond it. so we have there core of knowledge that works and it can could turn out that when you have shorter distances and higher energies you get to do mains you haven't explored; that you find out that fundamentally the rules are very different but we still have this base of knowledge that works, that makes predictions. i think that we have never reached a point where we have all of the answers. >> rose: we conclu
the conflict began 16 months ago. russia indicated the it could be used as a precursor so military intervention, the ambassador to the united nations called those paranoid and as relations deteriorate, the government is using fighter jets against its own citizens and i am pleased to have ambassador churkin back at this table thank you. >> you come from the united nations. >> yes, i do. >> rose: so you have some information about where we are, because it is a subject of great discussion over there. where are we? what is going on? >> well, we are not in a good place, of course, because we do have the ground to work on productively in trying to deal with the situation in syria, but we don't use it properly. what i am referring to is of course kofi annan's effort as a joint special enjoy to the secretary-general of the united nations and the arab league and also the conference he conducted in geneva on the 30th of june which was actually proposed initially by russia but also picked up by him and convened in the form of the action group which adopted a very good document. the main goal set in that
threat against us is to win the argument. and how do we win the argument? we have to live our values. we have to show kids who are about to decide whether to strap on a suicide vest that if they don't do that, we are helping to provide opportunity in their countries. >> rose: ratan tata, judith rodin and jane harman when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> additional funding provided by these funders: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> for almost 100 years the rockefeller foundation has been a world leader in philanthropy and global dome this week they are hosting their second annual innovation forum, leaders from the business, government, and nonprofit sectors gather to address the most pressing-- ratan tata will receive a lifetime achievement award for his work in philanthropy, chairman of the tata group a family run global conglomerate that has been giving back to india since its founding in 1868. since becoming company chairman in 1991 he has run the group's charitable efforts
help us understand the extraordinary announcement coming out of geneva last week about understanding matter. >> it's an elusive, invisible stuff. you don't see it. you have to find some way to access it. and the proposal-- which now seems to bear fruit-- is if you slam protons together, other particles, at very, very high speed, which is what happens with the large had dron collider. >> rose: and you can only do that with a collider like this. >> exactly. and you can sometimes jig this will invisible... sometimes flick out a little speck of this molasses, which would be a higgs particle. so people look for that little speck of a particle and now there's evidence that it has been found. >> it is the thing that explains to us how our fundamental particles got mass and it's a piece of the puzzle and now that we have this we can move on from here and maybe it isn't even a standard model higgs. maybe it's something more exotic. that remains to be seen. >> rose: what would be another big question this might help us understand? >> well, there are a number of questions. one of the questions
, you know, like whose data you are using and what are the terms of that and all of that, you get to make thing that really work for people, and i think that, you know, our understanding of search and the kind of things people are looking for is improving all the time and you don't think about it, but, you know, we didn't used to have maps, you couldn't type an address and get directions somewhere and that is something you come to expect now, i type an address i can navigate or i can get a really great high resolution image of that place or whatever, and so i think that search is really a moving target, you know, it is always getting a lot better, you don't always see it because it is like every day to make it better i think the next big change in search will be really search understanding you. >> rose: and mark around, marc andreessen the leader of netscape and in silicon valley. >> the whole point of capitalism is unleash potential and money is marker to quantify the success and that creates resources financial resources that can be put back into society. again, for the same m
there. viking river cruises, proud sponsor of masterpiece. visit us at pbs.org/masterpiece to watch video and explore features, and follow us on facebook and twitter. ithis program is available on blu-ray and dvd. to order, visit shoppbs.org or call us at 1-800-play-pbs. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org test test test test test test test test test test preelt wolf, wolf, >> rose: welcome to the program. we begin this evening with a man that time magazine called the sheriff of wall street, he is a u.s. attorney for the southern district of new york, preet bharara. >> there are some people very arrogant and some people who think they are above the law and think they can do no wrong and there are some people who think that maybe i may not get caught because nobody is enforcing these laws and part of our job in the white-collar area and other areas is to have people understand when they are doing if they are doing the cost benefit analysis of whether or not it makes sense to engage in this fraud or engage in this bad activity on wall street or somewhere else that
creativity and get us focusing on some of the things we think are really, really big. >> rose: i don't know if he advised you but i once was in the conversation with steve jobs and he said, you know, to some young entrepreneur, stay focused and do what you do well and is there a conscious -- he may have told you that. >> he told me that many times. you have too many things. >> rose: is that part of what you want to do as ceo to make sure you are in these core businesses? >> ye yes, i was talking with or people here in new york today and i told them, you know, i think it is really important that we make sure we are focused on the things that are really -- that are really big and important and that are going to hange the world and we do those things, really, really well. and that doesn't mean we are necessarily going to do 1,000 different things. >> rose: yes. and if you do something big as you have said, even if you fail you are more likely to find something that will make a contribution to what you want to do? >> you know,, that is absolutely true and, you know, i think we have had great su
to the program. we begin this evening with a man that time magazine called the sheriff of wall street, he is a u.s. attorney for the southern district of new york, preet bharara. >> there are some people very arrogant and some people who think they are above the law and think they can do no wrong and there are some people who think that maybe i may not get caught because nobody is enforcing these laws and part of our job in the white-collar area and other areas is to have people understand when they are doing if they are doing the cost benefit analysis of whether or not it makes sense to engage in this fraud or engage in this bad activity on wall street or somewhere else that should not be only considering whether or not they are going to have to pay, disgorge their profits and a penalty on top of that but consider in their calculation they may also go to jail and that changes the calculation i think considerably. and i think that is the way in which particularly in the white-collar area you can have some measure of deterrence. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a brief against, a brief agains
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 197 (some duplicates have been removed)